Do people really forget what happened when drinking? – Blackouts


counselorssoapbox

By David Joel Miller.

Memory, Blackouts, Alcohol and Drugs.

Alcohol and other drugs can impair memory in a number of ways. Alcoholics frequently say they can’t remember what happened while drinking. People who have never had a blackout question if the drinker really can’t remember, or do they just not want to take responsibility for their actions. Both are possible. Alcohol is not the only reason someone might do something and then have no memory of the occurrence. Consider the following examples.

Let’s say that the people in one of the classes I taught all became very close and the group decides they would like to have a celebration after the last session. We decide on a pizza party. We get out the phone book and look up the number. We are all old school, imagine the days before cell phone Apps. I read off the number and one of…

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Making the Rules


Caminao's Ways

While models are statements about the categories of things that may exist in business domains, rules are statements about business facts, i.e instances of those categories. Yet, given that requirements usually don’t come with categories fully and consistently defined upfront, the way rules are expressed can only be settled through requirements analysis.

As a consequence, from requirements lumps to well-formed expressions of business logic, rules will get through some metamorphosis. That raises two questions:  is it possible to map those transformations, and, if it’s the case, what kind of criteria should govern the making of the rules.

Footprint

The footprint of a rule is made of the categories of facts to be considered (aka rule domain), and categories of facts possibly affected (aka rule co-domain).

As far as systems are concerned, the first thing to do is to distinguish between actual contexts and symbolic representations. A naive understanding would assume rules to belong to either actual or…

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Speaking Friday at NC Philanthropy Conference


The Healthcare Marketer

AFPNCCONFThis Friday I will be speaking at the NC Philanthropy Conference in Concord, NC. I’ll serve on a panel at 8:30am and then will teach a Master Class at 10am. I’m honored that they invited me to speak. This is particularly meaningful to me because I come from a family of fundraisers and development professionals. My uncle, David Dunlop, spent his entire career as a development officer for Cornell University and became a thought leader within the fundraising profession. He created and directed Cornell’s major gift program, the first to use what has become known as “Moves Management.” From 1990 to 1995, he served on the senior management team of the Cornell Campaign that set a record for college and university campaigns, receiving over $1.5 billion in gifts. At the CASE International Assembly in Toronto on July 13, 2000, Dave was presented the Frank L. Ashmore Award for his service…

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New Tom Secker Article: ‘The CIA’s role in Hollywood’


2012 The Awakening

Friday, 2 August 2013

Tom Secker is a British based writer, researcher and filmmaker who specializes in terrorism, the security services and declassified history.  He has been writing on the philosophy and politics of fear since 2008. He also periodically contributes here on SmellsLikeHumanSpirit.com, and previously appeared on the Podcast in Episodes 12, 45, and 78. Below is his latest article, ‘The CIA’s role in Hollywood’:

 
Secret agents are supposed to be secret but their existence is common knowledge.  We know that they exist, but most people don’t know what they get up to, what they actually do.  The main reason for this is that the conventional news media coverage of intelligence agencies focuses almost exclusively on them gathering information, portraying them as passive observers of the shadowy underworlds that surround our ‘civilization’.  Their active role in covertly wielding influence on both a small and large scale…

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Should developers test?


mysoftwarequality

These are some of the arguments I have heard over the years:

1. Developers can’t test because they don’t have the right mindset, testers think about negative cases and how to break the system, developers only think about the happy path.

Is this true? There is indeed a huge amount of hackers that don’t care about much, and don’t give a rat’s arse about the quality of their code because they know there is a large number of lowly paid human beings called testers that will clean after them like a babysitter. They feel they shouldn’t bother with testing because other people will do it for them, they focus on writing tons of rubbish code and if a bug is found in production they don’t care because somebody will blame a tester for not finding it, certainly not them for writing it. I call this species the “half developer”. A…

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7Twelve Back-test


Systematic Investor

I recently came across the The 7Twelve Portfolio strategy. I like the catchy name and the strategy report, “An Introduction to 7Twelve.” Following is some additional info about the The 7Twelve Portfolio strategy that I found useful:

Today I want to show how to back-test the The 7Twelve Portfolio strategy using the Systematic Investor Toolbox.

Let’s start by loading historical data

Next, let’s make the The 7Twelve Portfolio strategy with annual/ quarterly and monthly rebalancing.

plot1

The strategy does better than the Vanguard 500 Index benchmark, but still suffers a huge draw-down in 2008-2009 period.

How would you make it a better strategy? Please share your ideas.

To view the complete source code for this example, please have a look at the bt.7twelve.strategy.test() function in bt.test.r at github.

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